A pretty winter photo and a test

I’ve been far too quiet here, lately. Sorry about that. I’m revising a new book and that’s taking most of my mind. With that plus Yule right around the bend I fear this poor little blog is getting neglected. I’m testing this blog, too. Trying to get it linked up to my Google+ account. I’m having some technical difficulties there so do bear with me. For now, though, I thought I’d share a little picture with y’all. I went up to North Carolina last month and got a little unexpected surprise when it snowed.

snowhouse

 

Yes, it was cold, no I hadn’t driven in it in years (and gotta admit, zinging around those mountains in it was a bit scary) but it was pretty. Winter is upon us, I guess… ;)

On Spiritual Emergency, Shamanism, Mental Illness, Therapy, and Anti-Psychiatry Sentiment in the General Pagan/Polytheist Community

Juli D. Revezzo:

Boosting Camilla’s signal because it seems important.

Originally posted on Foxglove & Firmitas:

Alternative Title: I’m Gonna Keep Talking About This Until It’s a Generally Accepted Thing…

It happened again. Someone posted another article on mental illness being a sign of a healer being born on the Local Pagan Facebook Group with the general overarching but not direct message being that all native and ancient cultures saw it as this. Now I don’t deny that mental illness can be the birth of a healer. I’ve known too many people who have struggled with a history of it, myself included, that haven’t found themselves called to help others dealing with similar problems.

However, these articles tend to stress how society is actually the sick one, and how we need to stop shoving pills at people to fix all their problems.

Anyone who has ever been on psychiatric medication will probably tell you that pills don’t solve all the problems and most professionals are pretty…

View original 2,710 more words

Enjoy the rain…Well. Maybe.

keepcalmrainTwo stops on the blog tour tonight, if you’d like to see them: Coffee, Art and Books, with a guest post about Changeling’s Crown and Peace Love and Writing. It’s been a rainy, thundery day today so I did way more plotting than anything (yep, I’m writing again!).

 

Pick your favorite rain related song and have a great one! :)

More books and about that vacation

As i said in a previous post or two I went on vacation last week, so didn’t get a whole lot of books like usual. I went to visit family and also got to tour the Lookout Mountain and Chickamauga battlefields in Tennessee. (Y’all saw the “ghost” right? It was the only one I *might* have seen. If there were more there, they were being gentlemen. (See why Caitlin loves her soldier ghost in the Antique Magic series, folks?) Anyway, the battlefield tour was so totally cool! :) I’ve been geeking out over the history of the two since then and reading whatever I can on it (slowpoke though I am about reading). Oh my gosh! It was so neat. Fear of heights, mainly forgotten. For a little while anyway. :) (Yes, I am a geek)

So these are what I got my hands on and am starting to poke through.

shermaninvadesjscalesSherman Invades Georgia by John R. Scales (who, yes, I went to the battlefield with so it is signed to me by the author! :)See that line above about geeking out at Lookout Mountain ;)).

Synopsis:

A longtime Special Forces officer with a Ph.D. in systems engineering presents a new perspective on one of the legendary campaigns of the Civil War, General William T. Sherman’s invasion of Georgia. Unlike most Civil War books that either treat individual battles and campaigns in a historical sense and give short shrift to planning, or study campaign planning with snippets from various campaigns to document specific features, General John Scales’s book takes advantage of modern planning techniques to fully examine what went into the Georgia campaign. He has limited the information in his book to that possessed by General Sherman at the time, as documented in his correspondence during the campaign and not in his after-the-fact reports and autobiography. Laid out in chapters that follow the format of an “estimate of the situation,” this book doesn’t simply recount the facts or attempt to provide a definitive history – other books do that – rather it offers a narrative of the campaign that illustrates a logical decision-making process as formulated in modern times. Published in cooperation with the Associations of the United States Army, the book serves two audiences: military professionals can use it for training purposes and Civil War buffs and interested laymen can gain a sense of the uncertainty that real commanders face by not having all the records of both sides at hand.

I also got: Union Soldier of the American Civil War (a Visual Reference) by Denis Hambucken and Chris Benedetto. (Yes, I bought a book about the North on the Southern battlefield’s store. Why, yes. I was blushing and ducking! But it’s for research,I swear!)

(Yes, I do kinda wish I’d gotten the companion Confederate Soldier of the American Civil War too). Are they suggesting story ideas? You bet. I’ve already got a WIP cooking. (*shh* If the muse hears me talking she’ll throw a  hissy fit). We’ll see what happens.

Summer Solstice confab.

West Metro Mommy Reads

To participate in Saturday Snapshot: post a photo that you (or a friend or family member) have taken then leave a direct link to your post in the Mister Linky below. Photos can be old or new, and be of any subject as long as they are clean and appropriate for all eyes to see. How much detail you give in the caption is entirely up to you. Please don’t post random photos that you find online

Here’s mine, in honor of Summer Solstice. The Solstice came and it’s already hot as heck here, so does it count? for what it’s worth I spent the day out walking and yeah…I think even the animals were taking advantage of the shade. You have to wonder if they laugh at us dumb humans, out in the hot sun.  During the latter part of the walk we found a confab of animals hiding out under the trees and these two facing off.

faceoff

You really think you’re taking that nut home, big guy?

:) I wonder what they were saying to each other. Were they facing off over an acorn stash… Or, thinking with a fantasy writer’s brain, were they planning some war against a common enemy?

Mother’s day science fiction and fantasy movies

Yesterday being Mother’s Day I thought I’d run a little list of our top favorite movie Moms specifically from Fantasy and SF genre. Let’s face it, fantasy and SF isn’t a genre big on the healthy family unit. Most parents are either abusive, neglectful (Igraine, Arthur’s mum, falls so in love with Uther, his father, that she ignores and finally gives her children up), or lost somewhere after the birthing process (Harry Potter/ and all the parents of the “orphan saviors” out there in the fantasy genre).

The problem with a list like this is that it reinforces the stereotype that “All women want babies!” which I can tell you without flinching, isn’t so. There are plenty of couples and happy to have their nests all to themselves.

But in the spirit of the holiday, yesterday, here are my nominees for the best Mothers of invent—er, in Fantasy and SF. ;) Ready? Here we go: Continue reading